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Fake.Louis Vuitton Guide I.


Monogram patterns: Generally, the first area you will notice when you glance at a LV item is the monogram pattern. Making it the best place to start when investigating possible counterfeit Louis Vuitton merchandise. The monogram pattern becomes the initial point of contact. And Louis Vuitton has several distinct monogram symbols. Each symbol has been trademarked by Louis Vuitton at different times throughout their history, and they are overwhelmingly faked.

Figure I: Relevant list of Louis Vuitton trademarked symbols [1]

SymbolRegistration NumberRegistration DateItems
0,297,594Sep 20, 1932This was trademarked for items such as luggage trunks, traveling bags, shoulder (satchel) bags, pocketbooks, evening bags (clutches), travel cases for hats and shoes (luggage), everyday handbags
LOUIS VUITTON1,045,932
1,990,760
1976
1996
Everything sold by Louis Vuitton ® [handbags, checkbook holders, jewelry, watches, luggage, phone cases etc]
1,519,828
1,938,808
1989
1995
Everything Louis Vuitton, from watches and jewelry to purses, bags etc.
2,177,828August 1998 Trademarked for all pieces of the Louis Vuitton collection, this pertains to all precious metal items (belt buckles, jewelry etc), watches, all leather goods (travel bags, purses etc), all apparel items (suits, socks, bath robes etc).
2,181,7533
023,930
1998
2005
™ for all pieces of the Louis Vuitton collection, this covers all precious metal items (bracelets, earrings etc), all leather goods (luggage, handbags etc), all apparel items (shirts, underwear, dresses, jackets, etc).
2,773,107
3,051,235
2003
2006
™ of the Louis Vuitton collection, this covers sunglasses, spectacles etc, precious metal items (cufflinks, necklaces etc), horological and chronometric instruments and apparatus, (watches, watch_cases, clocks etc), all leather goods (rucksacks, bags etc), all apparel items (t-shirts, hosiery, sweaters, etc).

Therefore these (aforementioned) monogram symbols on any non-Louis_Vuitton item is considered trademark infringement and would indicate that the item is obviously counterfeit. And there are generally two categories of counterfeit items: Deceptive and non-Deceptive [2].

(i) Deceptive counterfeit: The manufacture's intention is to sell the item as if it was the authentic version. The buyers in the case of deceptive counterfeits do not know they are buying a fake. These types of counterfeits often fetch high premiums.
(ii) Non-deceptive counterfeit: The manufacture is selling the item as a 'replica', or 'knock-off' item. The buyers in the case of non-deceptive counterfeits know they are buying a fake. This class of counterfeit often sells for much cheaper.

For the purpose of this tutorial, we are concerning ourselves with deceptive counterfeit items.
Step 1: How Louis Vuitton arranges the trademarked symbols on their products is one of the fastest and easiest ways to detect a counterfeit. The monogram patterns on authentic items should line up symmetrically. This means that whatever symbol (from Figure I) starts the sequence, that symbol must also end the sequence.

Figure 2: Symmetric sequence, starting and ending with the same symbol


Figure 3: Example of Louis Vuitton symbol sequence on Speedy bag

Louis Vuitton - Trending

Monogram Vernis
Louis Vuitton Neverfull
Louis Vuitton Totally GM & PM
Louis Vuitton Papillon 19
Louis Vuitton Papillon 26
Louis Vuitton Papillon 30
Louis Vuitton Manhattan PM & GM
Damier Geant Canvas Bags
Damier Granite Canvas
Embossed Leather
Louis Vuitton `Embossed
Louis Vuitton Epi Leather
Louis Vuitton Mahina

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(*) Also notice that the symbol starting and ending the sequence is a partial symbol. This is an important point. It is ok if the sequence starts with a partial symbol, however, whatever the symbol percentage is that begins the sequence, that same percentage should then end the sequence. (In the case of the example above, you can see that 1/2 of the circle symbol starts the sequence, and it is the same 1/2 circle symbol that ends it). This is a standard symmetry that an authentic Louis Vuitton item should demonstrate, and a quality detail that many of the fake_Louis Vuittonmonogram patterns will get wrong. (Not in all cases, but a number of fakes can be quickly eliminated this way. Some fakes [the higher quality] will have this detail correct).

Caveat: The partial symbol is something that Louis Vuitton does with the three (non-LV) symbols. The LV symbol is generally not used as a partial. It should be in complete form on Louis Vuitton items, and not severed by seam lines.

Figure 4: Monogram pattern with LV symbol




Guideline: The LV symbol will generally be in complete form within the Louis Vuitton monogram pattern.

Figure 5: Fake Louis Vuitton monogram pattern

Louis Vuitton - Trending

Monogram
Louis Vuitton Monogram Cruise
Louis Vuitton Monogram Damier
Monogram Damier Leather
Monogram Denim
Monogram Denim Patchwork
Monogram Graffiti
Monogram Groom
Monogram Leather
Monogram Mini Lin
Monogram Miroir - Mirror
Monogram Multicolor
Monogram Multicolore
Monogram Roses
Monogram Rubis
Monogram Shearling
Monogram Suede
Monogram Vernis
Monogram Watercolor
Patent leather
Monogram Patent Leather
Suhali leather
Louis Vuitton Suhali Leather
Steven Sprouse
Steven Sprouse Collection
Travel bags
Louis Vuitton Travel Bags
Mens bags
Louis Vuitton Mens Bags

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FAQ about the LV partial symbol:

Can the LV symbols ever be partials on an authentic Louis Vuitton?
YES. There are a few exceptions when Louis Vuitton will cut a LV logo. But these are rare. What you will find is that the vast majority of the time when you (the e-commerce shopper) encounter a cut LV logo, you will quickly find that the item is a counterfeit. This a solid rule of thumb guideline, and there is no need to create further confusion with blanket statements such as, the LV sliced logo is not always accurate. Because, 1) the counterfeiters are the only party that will benefit from the confusion, and 2) finding a sliced LV (partial symbol) on an authentic LV bag is such a rare event that it is not statistically significant in any meaningful way.
However, if (and when) you do encounter a partial LV logo and discover that the bag is a fake, that particular bag will most likely be considered a lower quality fake. Therefore, a handbag that is fake that has a partial LV symbol will undoubtedly have other signatures of its counterfeit origin somewhere else on the bag. Meaning that counterfeits with sliced LV symbols will generally represent a lower class of fakes, many of which might be considered non-deceptive counterfeits. The types of fakes you will find in thrift shops or on street corners. Therefore, if you find an LV logo that is sliced, and everything else looks perfect (which will be rare), in that case you might consider that you have encountered one of the rare authentic exceptions. However, if you find yourself in one of these rare cases, we recommend that you get a second opinion about the handbag before buying.
Figure 6: Authentic Louis Vuitton w/ partial LV
On the left is an example of a partial LV on an authentic Louis Vuitton. Notice the zipper runs over a corner of two of the LV symbols. This is an example of what happens when the monogram pattern needs to be adjusted to fit a specific model blueprint. But even in this case, the LV has been overlapped slightly, and the overlap is symmetric between the two symbols. There is a clear distinction between the necessary partial in Figure 6 and the error in Figure 5. (You can use the [ Ctrl + ] function to increase the image magnification to get a better look. Use [ Ctrl - ] to decrease img back to normal). [Mouse over zoom function coming soon for images that require closer inspection. These smaller details are important to understand as it is ofter times these smaller details that will shine a light on the true nature of the handbag in question.]





References:

[1] Case 1:12-cv-21778-XXXX Document 1 Entered on FLSD Docket 05/10/2012, UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA CASE NO., LOUIS VUITTON MALLETIER, S.A, Plaintiff,v. THE PARTNERSHIPS and UNINCORPORATED ASSOCIATIONS IDENTIFIED ON SCHEDULE “A” and DOES 1-1000, Defendants.
[2] Forget the “Real” Thing–Take the Copy! An Explanatory Model for the Volitional Purchase of Counterfeit Products, Elfriede Penz, Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien Barbara Stöttinger, Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien
[ http://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/v32/acr_vol32_158.pdf ]